New designer steroids are emerging at an alarming rate, 15 new products in two months!

First, thanks to our friends, colleagues and all of you who read our new blog. We were delighted to write it and share some thoughts on important topics in an exciting new forum. We weren’t sure what to expect when launching this concept, but we were pleasantly surprised by the readers. We hope to keep you interested and inspiring with our thoughts and possibly have a small impact on relevant questions in the process.

We’ve noticed that many of you are, like us, passionate about nutritional supplements. We have worked on issues related to such products for many years and we continue to do so today. While most manufacturers make trustworthy supplements, there is a subgroup that continues to operate in accordance with current regulations and manufacture potentially hazardous products.

We have faced the dangers first-hand, which include numerous cases of severe liver failure caused by the uneducated or unintentional use of powerful steroids. Most of them occur in our youth, college students or high school students looking for a beautiful and quick solution to a problem, who come across the wrong supplements on the Internet and seriously harm themselves. Many of them are derived from methylated steroids, which are unfortunately widely available on the Internet today, despite being well known.

We focused on the problem in the previous post, despite numerous attempts to the contrary, prohormones remain widely available today. At the time, one of the sites we visited was selling 84 products listed as prohormones. We recently visited this site again and found that 99 products are now included in the prohormone list. Surprisingly, 15 new products that are likely hidden illegal steroids or aromatase inhibitors hit the same site in two months. Sure, this is the holiday retail season, but this explosion seems ridiculous. In a brief overview, at least 75% of the 99 products contain active ingredients that are likely powerful steroids. Correct: 75% contain steroids, buy testover .

Some of these appear to be brand new compounds that we are researching, but others are just old steroids with a new and confusing nomenclature. A simple example with the compound Methasterone, also known as Superdrol and Methylmasterdrol, explains the situation well.

Methasterone became popular a few years ago. The FDA considered the compound a synthetic steroid and alerted one of the companies that made it. The following is an excerpt from the March 8, 2006 FDA warning letter:

“This email is for your Anabolic Xtreme Superdrol product containing the synthetic steroid Methasterone. In addition, your website contains statements regarding this product such as:

  • “Many people have gained pounds of muscle mass and increased their strength with this powerful supplement. »
  • “The average user will gain between £ 6 and £ 10 in just three weeks.

Although Anabolic Xtreme Superdrol is not currently available on your website, where it is marked Discontinued, it is still being distributed as a cross-border trade with your business and website name on it. The product label and your website represent this product as a dietary supplement. However, the product cannot be a dietary supplement because the active ingredient used in the product, methasterone, is not a vitamin, mineral, amino acid, herb, or other plant or dietary substance used by a person to supplement the diet by increasing the total. dietary intake, and is not a concentrate, metabolite, constituent, extract, or combination of any dietary component described above. Rather, it is a synthetic steroid. Therefore, methasterone is not a “dietary ingredient” as defined in Section 201 (ff) (1) of the FDA (Law) [21 USC 321 (ff) (1)], and your product not a dietary supplement because it does not contain a dietary ingredient.

The active compound present was 2a, 17a-dimethylandrostan-3-on-17b-ol. The compound on the label was spelled 2a, 17a dimethylethiocholan-3-one-17b-ol. Differences in labeling terminology can help mask an ingredient. Interestingly, the compound is not on the DEA’s list of controlled substances.

You’d think this was the last time we’ve seen the methasterone compound in supplements; After all, the FDA considers it a synthetic steroid. But alas, this is not the case. It is quite shocking that although the FDA opposed one company in 2006 for selling the synthetic steroid methasterone, many other companies are still selling the same synthetic steroid today than four years later. Unfortunately, this is just the tip of the iceberg.

Unfortunately, while many may have thought the era of designer steroids was over, the opposite seems plausible as the creation of new options only intensifies. While some, such as Methasterone products, are well known, others will require resources to study, characterize, and regulate. We look forward to participating in this process.

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